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Anniston Army Depot, Bynum, Calhoun County, Alabama, USA

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Location Category ID: 50850
Added to Database: 28 October 2010
Last Edited: 29 October 2010
Address:
Telephone: (256) 235-4473 (Fax)
Email: ANADprotocol [at] conus.army.mil (Replace [at] with @)
Opening Times:
Official Website: Anniston Army Depot
Other Links: Wikipedia
Latitude, Longitude: 33.65878142 , -85.96784592
Location Accuracy: 7
Tanks Previously Here: Models of tank built here:
1: M48A3 Tank (Primary organisation for upgrade from M48A1 to M48A3 1963-4)
2: M48A5 Tank (Sole organisation for upgrade from M48A1 and M48A3 to M48A5 1975-8)
3: M48A5E1 Tank (Sole organisation for upgrade from M48A1 and M48A3 to M48A5 1975-8)
4: M60A3 Tank (Primary organisation for upgrade from M60A1 to M60A3 from 1978)
5: M60A3 Tank - Anniston Upgraded (Upgrade to M60A3 ca1978)

Long term:
1: M48 Patton Tank - Fort Polk Military Museum, Leesville, Vernon Parish, Louisiana, USA (Until June 1978)
2: M48 Patton Tank - Fort Polk Military Museum, Leesville, Vernon Parish, Louisiana, USA (Until June 1978)
3: M103A2 Heavy Tank - Fort Polk Military Museum, Leesville, Vernon Parish, Louisiana, USA (Until February 1982)



Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) is a major United States Army facility fulfilling various depot operations. Primary missions are the repair of tracked vehicles and storage of chemical weapons (Anniston Chemical Activity). The depot is located in Bynum, Alabama. The depot employs over 2,000 people and covers 25 square miles (65 km2) of land. Tanks and other equipment are repaired and tested there, but historically Anniston's main role has been as a major munitions storage site, since WWII. Anniston is one of seven depots in the United States where chemical weapons are stored.
ANAD is the only depot capable of performing maintenance on heavy-tracked combat vehicles and their components. The depot is designated as the Center of Technical Excellence for the M1 Abrams tank and is the designated candidate depot for the repair of the M60 Patton tank, AVLB, M728, M88 Recovery Vehicle and M551 combat vehicles. ANAD is under command of the US Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command (TACOM). (Source: Wikipedia).
In November 1960 a study concluded that the M48A1 tank could readily be upgraded to M48A3 standard (with new diesel engine and other improvements) and that this could be accomplished more economically at Ordnance Depot facilities than by using a commercial contractor. The conversion work began at the Anniston and Red River Army Depots with the first tank being accepted by the Army in February 1963. This program provided 600 M48A3 tanks for the Army and 419 for the U.S. Marine Corps by late 1964. These tanks were deployed later to Vietnam where they were used in battle by both United States and South Vietnamese forces. (Source: Patton by R.P. Hunnicutt).
A further contract was awarded in 1975 for the Anniston Army Depot to convert 501 M48A3 tanks to the M48A5 configuration (including the installation of a 105mm gun in place of the original 90mm gun). The first of the production conversions was delivered in October 1975 and the last of the batch was completed in December 1976. Shortly after this, a far more extensive project was started to rework the M48A1 to the new configuration. Two pilot M48A1s were converted at Anniston and delivered in August 1976 followed by full production in October. This work continued until March 1978 and completed a batch of 708 M48A5s. Further work under this conversion program at Anniston continued until December 1979 ending with a grand total of 2069 M48A5s. (Source: Patton by R.P. Hunnicutt).
In 1978, as the M60A3 replaced the M60A1 on the Detroit production line, a program was initiated to upgrade large numbers of M60A1s to the M60A3 standard. This was conducted by Anniston Army Depot in the USA and Mainz Army Depot in Germany.

Location Images - Photographs and NavPix (click to expand or browse)

March 2005

“Four M-1 Abrams tanks are in various stages of upgrade on the reassembly line at Anniston Army Depot Combat Vehicle Facility”, from Defense.gov
1: “Four M-1 Abrams tanks are in various stages of upgrade ...

Taken: 1 March 2005
Contributor: U.S. Government
Location Photo ID: 352
Added: 29 October 2010
Views: 173
Has Priority: 0
    

    

    

1990

“M1 tanks arriving for overhaul at Anniston Army Depot (AL) railhead. These will probably leave the depot as M1A1 tanks. US ARMY PHOTO Courtesy of ANAD”, via Flickr.com
2: “M1 tanks arriving for overhaul at Anniston Army Depot (...

Taken: 1990 (Estimated)
Contributor: M. Holloway
Location Photo ID: 353
Added: 29 October 2010
Views: 203
Has Priority: 0