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KUBINKA NIIBT RESEARCH COLLECTION - SOVIET VEHICLES, KUBINKA, MOSCOW OBLAST, RUSSIA



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Number of Photos:
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Sample Photo

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Location Category ID:
2100
Address: NIIBT Collection, Kubinka
Telephone: (495) 544-8611
Email:
Opening Times: 10.00-17.00, Wednesday to Sunday (By previous appointment only)
Official Website: Military-Historical Museum of Armored Vehicles and Equipment
Other Links: Wikipedia
Volunteer Website
Latitude, Longitude: 55.5657 , 36.715638
Location Accuracy: 7
Tanks Previously Here:


For many years there were rumours of a secret armoured vehicle collection somewhere in Russia. While many Soviet vehicles are openly displayed around Russia, there is a notable absence of vehicles of other nationalities. Whilst this might partly be explained by national pride, it stood to reason that they must have a large number of foreign vehicles hidden away somewhere, especially German vehicles captured during the War and NATO vehicles ‘acquired’ since.
Over the years a certain amount of information filtered out from Russia, most notably a strong rumour that there was indeed such a collection and that it included the only surviving example of the Maus, Germany’s end-of-the-war super-heavy tank. Recently, particularly since the break up of the Soviet Union, a number of Westerners have gained access to the collection, now known to be stored at a military base at Kubinka and to be part of the Kubinka Tank Institute (‘NIIBT’).
The collection is located about 1 kilometre inside the army base at Kubinka, a small town approximately 40km west-south-west from central Moscow on the M1 road to Minsk. The vehicles are officially housed in and around seven hangars (Halls 1-7) as shown in the main plan. One hangar has German Second World War vehicles, one has Allied Second World War and NATO post-war vehicles, one has vehicles from other miscellaneous countries (France, Japan, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, etc.), one has Soviet wheeled vehicles, and three contain an impressive collection of Soviet tracked vehicles. Outside the hangars there are a number of other Soviet vehicles on display, plus a large armoured train. There are, in fact, two further storage buildings that are not open to visitors. Hall 8, located with the administration building, holds recent acquisitions, often from field trials, and vehicles being prepared for display elsewhere. Hall 9, along with its open storage area, houses part of the reserve collection including duplicate vehicles and vehicles retired from other locations, many of which were previously displayed on plinths around Russia. It should be noted that most Soviet vehicles at Kubinka are marked with an identification number which is not a tactical number but a collection reference number.
The Soviets have undoubtedly managed to collect together at Kubinka one of the largest armoured vehicle collections in the world. Not only does it contain the best collection of Soviet vehicles in the world, which is only to be expected, but it also contains a representative sample of all the major designs produced by their allies and enemies throughout this century. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the collection is the number of unusual and rare vehicles that were accumulated – probably more by accident than design – and typified by the German, Hungarian and Japanese vehicles. The collection had about a third more vehicles in the 1960’s and 1970’s but these vehicles, including many Second World War German ones, were cut up for scrap.
It is to be hoped that with the increasing openness of the CIS, many more people will soon be able to visit, and appreciate, the Kubinka collection. However, this process seems to be taking place only very slowly. With an injection of cash and enthusiasm it could become a first-league collection, alongside Bovington and Fort Knox and, to a lesser extent, Saumur and Aberdeen Proving Ground. It is of course inevitable that it will increasingly lose its charm and air of mystery as probably the last major tank collection in the world kept behind closed doors.

External Display Area

There was a replica tank stored on the waste ground behind Hall 2 until recently. It represented one of a series of contingency designs built during Siege of Odessa in the winter of 1941 and known as NI (“Na Ispug”, ‘The Frightener’) or “Odessa tanks”. They were based on the STZ series of tracked agricultural tractors and were under-powered, and only lightly armed and armoured. Three replicas were built in the 1970’s in Kiev and shown to President Brezhnev; this one was presented to the museum but is now in storage.

Location ID:
2105
Latitude, Longitude:55.565194, 36.715531
Location Accuracy:7



1) KS Tank French / Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 342

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Unique ID: 342
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification:

This is a KS or “Reno Russkiy” light tank. The KS was a direct copy of the French Renault FT-17 and was built at Krasnoye Sormovo (hence the ‘KS’). The prototype was named “Freedom Fighter Comrade Lenin”. This example has this legend painted on its side, but is believed to be a different vehicle and partly a replica.


2) BT-5 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 343

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Unique ID: 343
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection Number 401 painted on turret sides.

The BT series formed the backbone of the Soviet medium tank force before the introduction of the T 34. This appears to be a BT-2 Model 1932 (M-1932) but is actually reworked from a later BT-5 for display purposes. The BT-5 was the second major production model of the series and had a 45mm gun in a large cylindrical turret, with a new engine and stronger suspension.


3) MS Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 344

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Unique ID: 344
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Name:
Other Identification:

This is an example of the first tank of largely Soviet design, the MS (“Maliy Soprovozhdeniya” or Small Support Vehicle) light tank. Also known as the T-18, it was based on the KS but had a new, more compact engine compartment, a new engine and new suspension. This one is fitted with mock up roadwheels, turret and guns, and T-54 tracks cut in half lengthways. The replica turret is laterally inverted (sources: R. Fleming, R. Stickland).


4) IS-3M Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 345

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Unique ID: 345
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection Number 101.

In November 1944 the IS design team, led by N. L. Dukhov, was ordered to work on a more effective armour layout for the IS-2. The resulting design was developed concurrently with the IS-2M. It had a hull with a sharply sloped nose - earning it the nickname of “Schuka” (‘Pike’) and a very distinctive ‘frying pan’ turret. It entered production as the IS-3 and its clean shape was the forerunner of most post-war Soviet designs.


5) T-34-85M Tank Soviet


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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 346

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Unique ID: 346
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 201 painted on turret sides, previously 301.

M-1945/1969. The T-34 was the standard medium tank of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. It was arguably the best tank of the War in any army as it had good armament, sloped armour, good mobility and a reliable chassis. It was also easier and cheaper to manufacture than its main German counterpart, the Panther. The T-34-85 was introduced at the end of 1943 and benefited from a three-man turret and a powerful 85mm gun (originally the D-5T model, later the ZIS S 53). There were several different production models built at different factories. This is a Model 1945 with Model 1969 upgrade programme modifications.

Hall 1: Soviet Heavy Tanks

The collection of heavy tanks in Hall 1 is arranged in a similar way to the other Soviet halls, that is in two opposing rows of vehicles, but the first row begins with an area set aside for oversize vehicles. These are the T-35 Model 1933 heavy tank, and the SU-14BR-2 and SU-100-Y SP guns.

Location ID:
2110
Latitude, Longitude:55.564742, 36.716448
Location Accuracy:7



6) T-35 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 347

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Unique ID: 347
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 102 painted on turret sides.

M-1933. The multi-turreted T-35 design was inspired by the British Vickers-Armstrong Independent of 1926 and was first seen in a Red Square parade in 1932. This T-35 is the only surviving example.


7) SU-14BR-2 Self-Propelled Gun Soviet


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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 348

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Unique ID: 348
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 103 painted on left superstructure side.

The SU-14BR-2 mounted the Model 1935 152mm B10 naval gun on a 65 tonne chassis using components of the T-28 and T-35 heavy tanks. This prototype was built in 1939 and took part in the defence of Moscow in 1941/2.


8) SU-100Y Self-Propelled Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 349

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Unique ID: 349
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 104 painted on left turret side.

After introducing the T 100 heavy tank, the Soviets used one chassis as the basis of the SU 100Y (also known as the SU-130Y ‘Igrek’). This prototype mounted a 130mm Br13 gun. It served as a T-100 in Finland in 1940; later as an SU-100Y near Kubinka defending Moscow.


9) KV-1S-85 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 350

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Unique ID: 350
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 105 painted on left turret side.

At the same time as the T-100 was being built, a more conventional single-turreted tank was being designed. This proved to be the better design and was manufactured in large quantities as the KV-1 and, with design changes to reduce weight, as the KV-1S (for “Skorostnoi”, ‘fast’). Kubinka has an example of the KV-1 but it is currently on permanent loan to the Central Armed Forces Museum in Moscow. A prototype, the KV-1S-85, was developed armed with the 85mm gun from the forthcoming Iosef Stalin tank, the IS 1. The idea proved successful and as an interim measure some 130 KV-1S vehicles were put into production as the KV-85. They were fitted with complete IS-1 turrets as these had become available.


10) SU-152 Assault Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 351

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Unique ID: 351
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 106 painted on left turret side.

Another attempt to provide the KV chassis with greater firepower was the SU 152. This self-propelled gun mounted a Model 1937 152mm gun in a fixed superstructure on the KV 1S chassis and a small series was produced.


11) IS-2M Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 352

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Unique ID: 352
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 107 painted on left turret side.

The Iosef Stalin tank was planned to replace the KV series and it was soon decided that even an 85mm gun would not be sufficient for it. Trials were conducted with experimental IS tanks, the IS-100 and IS-122, armed with 100mm and 122m guns. In November 1943 the IS-122 was demonstrated at Kubinka, Russia’s main armoured vehicle test site, in the proving ground that surrounds the army base. The first round fired at a range of 1,500 metres ripped through the frontal armour of a captured Panther and blasted out through the rear hull armour. Not surprisingly, the GKO ruled in favour of the design, and it entered production in December 1943 as the IS-2. This early model IS-2, an M-1943, has been upgraded to an IS-2M.


12) ISU-130 Assault Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 353

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Unique ID: 353
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 108 painted on left turret side.

Following the introduction of the IS series, the SP mountings formerly built on KV chassis were produced on the IS as the ISU-122 and ISU-152. The chassis was also used in 1944 as the basis for another SP gun, the ISU-130 (Obiekt 247, according to some sources), mounting a 130mm gun. It did not enter large scale production and only a small number were built.


13) IS-3 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 354

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Unique ID: 354
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 109 painted on left turret side.


14) ISU-152 M-1945 Assault Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 355

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Unique ID: 355
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 110 painted on left turret side.

The chassis of the IS-3 was used in 1945 as the basis of another ISU-152, the Model 1945 or Obiekt 704. The design did not enter production, only this example being built.


15) IS-4 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 356

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Unique ID: 356
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 111 painted on left turret side.

This was a new design of heavy tank armed with a 122mm gun and two 12.7mm DShK MGs. It was built in limited numbers, about 250, in 1947 and 1948.


16) IS-7 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 357

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Unique ID: 357
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 112 painted on left turret side.

This was an experimental design, of which a number of different prototypes were built. This is a 1947/48 prototype.


17) T-10 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 358

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Unique ID: 358
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 113 painted on left turret side.

In 1950 a modernised derivative of the IS-4 and IS-7, the IS-8, was accepted for production. Due to Stalin’s death in 1953 it was redesignated T-10 when it entered service that year and continued to be produced until 1957.


18) ISU-152K Assault Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 359

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Unique ID: 359
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 114 painted on left turret side.

The ISU-152K assault gun was the wartime ISU-152 remanufactured with a newer V-54-K engine, improved stowage and other features.


19) T-10 Tank Soviet


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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 360

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Unique ID: 360
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 115 painted on left turret side.

The T-10 was quickly followed into production by an improved version, the T-10M. This was manufactured from 1957 to 1962. It had a new turret, sights, gun stabiliser, multiple-baffle muzzle brake, and other mechanical improvements.


20) ISU-152M Assault Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
0
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 361

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Unique ID: 361
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 116 painted on left turret side.

The ISU-152M SP gun was a post-war modernisation of the ISU-152 series.


21) Obiekt 266 Self-Propelled Gun Soviet


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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 362

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Unique ID: 362
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 117 painted on left turret side.

The T-10 formed the basis of a number of further prototypes, both of heavy tanks such as Obiekt 266 and Obiekt 277 and of self-propelled guns such as Obiekt 268. The Obiekt 266 was built in 1957 and used an experimental transmission.


22) Obiekt 268 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 363

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Unique ID: 363
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 118 painted on left turret side.

The Obiekt 268 SP gun is based on the T 10, but the gun is mounted in a fixed superstructure in place of the turret and uses a stereoscopic rangefinder.
(“Obiekt” is variously translated as ‘Object’, ‘Project’ or ‘Item’. The original is used throughout this work).


23) Obiekt 277 Tank Soviet


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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 364

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Unique ID: 364
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 119 painted on left turret side.

The Obiekt 277 heavy tank is very similar to the T-10 but has an internal gun mantlet on the turret. It was built in 1957 and is armed with a 130mm M-65 gun and a 14.5mm MG.


24) Obiekt 279 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 365

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Unique ID: 365
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 120 painted on left turret side.

The Obiekt 279 heavy tank has a turret very similar to the Obiekt 277 design. However, the hull is a very large boat shape tapering out at the sides almost to a knife-edge, giving it the appearance of having a very steep sloping glacis plate all round. The hull is mounted on four sets of tracks; these run the full length of the hull, two on each side. There are five roadwheels for each track, no return rollers, and the idler and sprocket wheels are at the same level as the roadwheels to keep them clear of the boat-hull. The outer armour is thin plate fixed around a hull core. It was developed in 1957 to investigate AFV survival on the nuclear battlefield.


25) Obiekt 770 Tank Soviet


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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 366

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Unique ID: 366
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 121 painted on left turret side.

The Obiekt 770 was built in 1957. It is very similar again to the Obiekt 277 but in place of the seven small roadwheels and three return rollers each side on the T 10/Obiekt 277 vehicles, it has six large roadwheels each side and no return rollers.


26) Obiekt 416 Self-Propelled Gun Soviet


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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 367

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Unique ID: 367
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 122 painted on left turret side.

The Obiekt 416 also goes under the designation SU-100. It is unusual in mounting the gun in a fully-rotating turret at the back of the chassis.


27) SU-100P Prototype Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 368

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Unique ID: 368
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 123 painted on left turret side.

The SU-100P is a self-propelled gun based on a new design of chassis. It mounts a 100mm weapon in a small square superstructure at centre of the hull, with an open crew compartment behind. The SU-100P, Obiekt 112, SU-152P, SU-152G and SU 152 were all manufactured by Uralmash; the designer was L. Gorlitsky.


28) Obiekt 112 Prototype Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 369

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Unique ID: 369
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 124 painted on left turret side.

The Obiekt 112 armoured carrier is based on the same chassis as the SU-100P. It is also known as the Izdeliye 112 and BTR-112.


29) SU-152P Prototype Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 370

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Unique ID: 370
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 125 painted on left turret side.

The SU-152P self-propelled gun was built in 1949. It has an extended chassis with seven roadwheels per side instead of the six of the Obiekt 112 and SU-152G.


30) Obiekt 108 (SU-152G) Prototype Soviet


Number of Photos:
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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 371

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Unique ID: 371
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 126 painted on left turret side.

The SU-152G self-propelled gun is based on the same chassis as the SU-100P. It was built in 1949 and has an enclosed turret mounting a short howitzer.


31) Obiekt 120 (SU-152) Prototype Soviet


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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 372

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Unique ID: 372
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 127 painted on left turret side.

The SU 152 is a similar design but with a long, rounded turret in place of the square turrets of the other vehicles.


32) 2S3 Self-Propelled Howitzer Soviet


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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 373

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Unique ID: 373
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 128 painted on left turret side.

During the early 1970s the Soviet Army introduced two self-propelled howitzers, the 122mm 2S1 and the 152mm 2S3 Acacia. The 2S3 was based on an adaptation of the chassis developed for the 2P24 Krug (SA-4 Ganef) mobile SAM system, but with six rather than seven roadwheels each side. It mounted its howitzer in a turret with all round traverse.


33) 2S5 Self-Propelled Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 374

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Unique ID: 374
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 129 painted on left turret side.

The 2S5 has its long-barrelled 152mm gun in an unprotected mounting at the hull rear.

Hall 2: Soviet Medium Tanks



Location ID:
2115
Latitude, Longitude:55.565152, 36.71647
Location Accuracy:7



34) T-34 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 375

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Unique ID: 375
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 202 painted on left turret side.

This appears to a T-34-76 Model 1943, with distinctive hexagonal turret, mounting a 76mm gun - a model sometimes also known under the German wartime designation of T-34-76C. It actually consists of a turret taken from a river monitor boat and welded to the hull of a T-34-85.


35) T-34-85M Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 376

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Unique ID: 376
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 203 painted on left turret side.

Model 1945/1969.


36) SU-100 Tank Destroyer Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 452

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Unique ID: 452
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 204 painted on left superstructure side.

When the T-34-85 was introduced, the SU-85 was replaced by an improved vehicle with a 100mm Model 1944 D-10S gun, the SU-100. It was the standard self-propelled gun for mechanised and armoured divisions from late 1944. This is an SU-100M with post war upgrades, including headlights and horn, and stowage boxes on the right-hand side.


37) SU-122 Assault Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 453

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Unique ID: 453
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 205 painted on left superstructure side.

Following standard Soviet practice the T-34 chassis was used as the basis for a number of self-propelled guns. In parallel with the development of the SU-76 a prototype self-propelled howitzer based on the T-34 was constructed and designated the SU-122. It was designed to provide artillery fire support to tank divisions but had little effect against armoured vehicles. It was withdrawn in the autumn of 1943 and replaced by the SU-85.


38) T-44 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 454

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Unique ID: 454
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 206 painted on left turret side.

During 1944 a new medium tank was built based on the T-34 and designated T-44. It had some difficulties with mechanical reliability but was generally a good interim design. About 1000 were built and issued to service units. Production was stopped in 1947 in favour of the T 54. This is a very early production vehicle with the same narrow track as the T-34.


39) SU-101 Tank Destroyer Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 455

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Unique ID: 455
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 207 painted on left superstructure side.

In 1944 a prototype self-propelled gun was built using components from the T-34 and T-44 but did not enter production. It had its main armament mounted at the rear of the vehicle and was known as the SU-101.


40) T-54 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 479

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Unique ID: 479
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 208 painted on left turret side.

In 1946 a further medium tank design was developed based on the T-44 design but with an improved suspension and transmission. This new tank, the T-54, was altogether a much more reliable and effective design. This is an initial production T-54, a Model 1946. This model mounted a new 100mm gun but the turret retained an external mantlet and front and rear overhangs similar to the T-44.


41) T-54 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 480

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Unique ID: 480
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 209 painted on left turret side.

This early model T-54 has the turret undercut only at the rear, and has an internal mantlet. Small numbers were produced as the T-54 M-1949. The next production model T-54 had the turret undercut removed, and saw limited series production as the T-54 M-1951.


42) T-54A Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 481

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Unique ID: 481
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 210 painted on left turret side.

The standard production model of the T-54, the M-1953, appeared in Hungary during 1956 and was designated the T-54A by the West. It had a fume-extractor near the end of the gun barrel; it also had an elevation stabiliser fitted in the turret.


43) SU-122-54 Assault Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 482

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Unique ID: 482
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 211 painted on left superstructure side.

The T-54 chassis was used for a number of self-propelled weapons. In 1949 an experimental vehicle was built mounting a 122mm D49S tank gun in a fixed mounting together with a dual purpose machine gun. It was designated SU 122 54 (but also known as the IT-122) and entered service in small numbers and shrouded in great secrecy.


44) ZSU-57-2 Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 483

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Unique ID: 483
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 212 painted on left turret side.

1950 saw the introduction of the ZSU-57-2 which was a special anti-aircraft vehicle based on the T 54 chassis, but with one less road wheel per side, and mounting two 57mm AA guns.


45) T-55 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 484

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Unique ID: 484
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 213 painted on left turret side.

A new, modified version of the T-54 was developed in 1954 and the first model was produced from 1955 to 1960. It had an improved engine and transmission, a Siklon gun stabiliser, new snorkel equipment and other changes and was designated the T-55.


46) T-55AM2 Tank Soviet


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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 485

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Unique ID: 485
Serial Number:
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Name:
Other Identification:

This is an improved version of the T-55 fitted with BDD ‘horseshoe’ appliqué armour. It replaces the previous exhibit, the T-55S Almaz tank (#214), which moved to Hall 8. (Source: R. Fleming).


47) Obiekt 483 Flame-Throwing Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 486

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Unique ID: 486
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 215 painted on left turret side.

The Obiekt 483 has a short flame-thrower barrel in place of the main armament. It was a development in 1959 of a T-54 as a test-bed for flame-throwers and did not enter production.


48) TO-55 Flame-Throwing Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 487

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Unique ID: 487
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 216 painted on left turret side.

The OT-55 has the flame-thrower in a coaxial mount to the right of the main armament, and was manufactured in small numbers from 1956 to 1962.


49) T-62 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 488

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Unique ID: 488
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 217 painted on left turret side.

The T-55 was supplemented in 1962 by the T-62. This replaced the D10T rifled gun with a 115mm U-5TS smoothbore gun firing a hypervelocity APFSDS fin-stabilised round.


50) Obiekt 167 Tank Soviet


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1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 489

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Unique ID: 489
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 218 painted on left turret side.

The Obiekt 167 was an experimental tank design with a conventional live track and return roller arrangement with the aim of improving cross-country performance relative to the T-62. It was armed with a 9M14 (‘AT-3 Sagger’) missile system on the turret rear.


51) T-55 Tank Soviet


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Unique ID: 490
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This is a version of the T-55 mounting the Drozd (‘Thrush’) active armour system. It replaces the previous exhibit, the Obiekt 167T tank (#219), which moved to Hall 8. (Source: R. Fleming).


52) Obiekt 150/IT-1 Tank Soviet


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1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 491

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Unique ID: 491
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 220 painted on left turret side.

The Obiekt 150 was an anti-tank guided missile version of the T 62 firing the Drakon ATGM and has the original T-62 suspension arrangement with five road wheels per side and no return rollers. It entered service in small numbers in a modified form as the IT-1.


53) Obiekt 430 Tank Soviet


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1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 492

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Unique ID: 492
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 221 painted on left turret side.

Obiekt 430 was the original test-bed for the T-64 developed in 1960. It was fitted with a 100mm D-10 gun, and a 5 cylinder 600hp 5TD engine in a new design of chassis. It was developed into the prototype T-64 (Obiekt 432) then the series production T-64 (Obiekt 434).


54) Obiekt 432 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
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Unique ID: 493
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 222 painted on left turret side.

Obiekt 435 was a pre-series T-64 armed with a 115mm U-5TS gun fitted with an autoloader. It had a distinctive ‘pepper pot’ muzzle brake and was produced in small numbers.


55) Obiekt 434 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 494

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Unique ID: 494
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 223 painted on left turret side.

Obiekt 434 had a 125mm gun and the 5TDF engine in its final form.


56) T-64A Tank Soviet


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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 495

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Unique ID: 495
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 224 painted on left turret side.

The vehicle designed to replace the T-62 was the T-64, the standard production vehicle being designated the T-64A. It incorporated a new suspension arrangement with return rollers and six small roadwheels per side. At the time of its introduction it was known that Chobham armour was to be incorporated into Western tanks. The T 64 was therefore armed with an enlarged version of the U-5T gun, which had a calibre of 125mm. It was in production from 1967 to 1969. This is a 1967 production model.


57) T-64 Experimental Prototype Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 496

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Unique ID: 496
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 225 painted on left turret side.

The T-64 itself formed the basis for a number of prototypes including Obiekt 775, 287 and 288. Obiekt 775 is a very unusual vehicle, resembling the T-64 but it is only about two-thirds as high. The chassis is based on the T-64 chassis but is slightly lower; however the turret is extremely low, less than a metre high. It is armed with a 125mm gun firing the Rubin ATGM missile. Small numbers were built in 1962.


58) T-64 Experimental Prototype Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 497

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Unique ID: 497
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 226 painted on left turret side.

Obiekt 287 has a chassis based on the T-64 but it is fitted with a very low turret. It is armed with two turret mounted 73mm guns and a Typhoon ATGM system. It was built in 1961.


59) T-64 Experimental Prototype Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 498

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Unique ID: 498
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 227 painted on left turret side.

Obiekt 288 has a chassis based on the T-64 but it is fitted with a windowed cab in place of the turret. It is an unarmed engine test-bed vehicle and is fitted with two 350hp engines. It was built in 1963.


60) Obiekt 172 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
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Unique ID: 499
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 228 painted on left turret side.

Soon after the introduction of the T-64, the Soviets introduced another main battle tank of apparently very similar design, the T-72. Competing designs had been requested from two design bureaux, and both implemented. It would appear that two of the vehicles in the Hall, Obiekt 172 and 172M are prototypes of the T-72 but based on T-64 chassis. It is of interest to note that the Obiekt 172 retains the six small steel-tyred roadwheels per side of the T-64.


61) Obiekt 172M Tank Soviet


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Unique ID: 500
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 229 painted on left turret side.

The Obiekt 172M was developed in 1971 from the Obiekt 172 but with the suspension of the Obiekt 167, with its six medium-sized rubber-tyred roadwheels per side. It became the series prototype for the T-72.


62) T-72AV Tank Soviet


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1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 501

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Unique ID: 501
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 230 painted on left turret side.

This is a T-72AV fitted with KDZ (‘Komplekt Dinamicheskoy Zashity’) explosive reactive armour (ERA) boxes around the hull and turret. KDZ was developed at Kubinka.


63) Obiekt 219R Tank Soviet


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1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 502

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Unique ID: 502
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 231 painted on left turret side.

The Obiekt 219R is the production version of the T-80B. It resembles the T-72 but has improved armour protection and is powered by a new gas turbine engine.


64) Obiekt 219A Tank Soviet


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Unique ID: 503
Serial Number:
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This is a prototype of the T-80U with reactive armour. It arrived at the museum in 1996.

Hall 3: Soviet Light Tanks



Location ID:
2120
Latitude, Longitude:55.565519, 36.716529
Location Accuracy:7



65) Carden-Loyd Mark VI Tankette British / Soviet


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Unique ID: 504
Serial Number:
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Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 302 painted on left side.

The first row of vehicles in Hall 3 starts with a T-27 Model 1932 (T-27A) tankette built in 1931. The T-27 was a licence-built version of the British Carden-Loyd Mark VI tankette, but incorporating a number of changes.


66) T-26 Light Tank British / Soviet


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Unique ID: 505
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 303 painted on left turret side.

The T-26 was also originally a licence-built version of a British tank, in this case the Vickers 6-ton light tank. It was produced in three basic production models: the Model 1931 with two small turrets, the Model 1933 with one larger turret, and the Model 1937 with sloped turret armour and a reconfigured hull. This example is a T 26 M-1931 (‘T-26A’), built in 1932.


67) T-26 Light Tank British / Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 506

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Unique ID: 506
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 304 painted on left turret side.

Towards the end of its life the T-26 was considerably redesigned to produce this final version of the T-26, known M-1937 (‘T-26S’). It was largely of welded, rather than bolted, construction while the turret front was drop forged. This example has a modified rear hull as it was prepared for a parade and fitted with a GAZ-51 truck engine. It has also been provided for other displays in the Moscow region.


68) OT-130 Flame-Throwing Tank British / Soviet


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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 507

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Unique ID: 507
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 305 painted on left turret side.

This is an early production model, built in 1938, of the flame-throwing version of the T-26 M 1933 (‘T 26B’) known as the OT-130. This mounted a flame-thrower in place of the main armament and was in service from 1939 to 1941.


69) BT-5 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 508

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Unique ID: 508
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 306 painted on left turret side.

This BT-5 is unusual in being fitted with an uprated M-17 engine in place of the standard M 5 engine. It is configured for road transit on its wheels, with its tracks removed and stowed on the track guards.


70) T-37 Amphibious Tank Soviet


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Unique ID: 509
Serial Number:
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Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 307 painted on left turret side.

Another Soviet vehicle based on a British design was the T-37 light tank. A Carden-Loyd A4E11 amphibious tank purchased from Vickers formed the basis of its prototype, the T-33. The later T-37A omitted the balsa wood side floats of the T-37. This example was built in 1933; production took place from 1935 to 1936, and some vehicles were still in service in 1942.


71) T-30 / T-40 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
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Unique ID: 510
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 308 painted on left turret side.

A prototype light amphibious tank was developed to replace earlier designs and was known as the T-30. Two prototypes of this vehicle were developed, the T-30 which was amphibious and the T-30S (“Sukhoputniy” or ‘ground only’) which was not.


72) T-30 / T-40 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 511

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Unique ID: 511
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 309 painted on left turret side.

The T-30 was accepted for production in December 1939 as the T-40. This particular T-40 is unusual in being armed with the 20mm ShVAK cannon; this weapon armed the T 30 prototype but the smaller 12.7 DShK HMG was more common on production models of the T-40 as the 20mm cannon was also required for use as an anti-aircraft weapon.


73) T-50 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 512

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Unique ID: 512
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 310 painted on left turret side.

In 1940 some advanced light tank designs were developed, with sloped armour all round, in order to provide better armour protection. This resulted in the T 126SP and T-127 prototypes, developed as replacements for the T-26. The T 126SP was accepted for production as the T-50.


74) T-50 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 513

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Unique ID: 513
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 311 painted on left turret side.


75) T-60 Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 514

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Unique ID: 514
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 312 painted on left turret side.

A new model of light tank was introduced in 1940, the T-60, which was an improved design based on the T-30 prototype, with the main armament increased to a 20mm TNSh-20 cannon (a variant of the ShVAK aircraft cannon), and 20mm frontal armour. This vehicle appears to be an early T-60 M 1941, although it has a mix of spoked and solid road wheels from the M 1941 and M-1942 (‘T 60A’) respectively.


76) T-70 Light Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
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Unique ID: 515
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 313 painted on left turret side.

The very successful T-60 formed the basis for two further designs, the T-70 and T 80. The T-70 had increased armour and a new welded turret. This is a 1942 T-70M (although the ‘M’ designation is often dropped as few examples of the original T-70 were built). The T-70M had increased turret armour, improved transmission, wider tracks and different drive sprockets.


77) ZSU-37 Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 516

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Unique ID: 516
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 314 painted on left turret side.

The ZSU-37 self-propelled anti-aircraft gun was developed during 1944. This is the original prototype, also known as the SU-72, and not a production version.


78) SU-76M Self-Propelled Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 517

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Unique ID: 517
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 315 painted on left turret side. It also carries Guards insignia.

On 23 October 1942 the Chief Defence Commissariat issued specifications for the construction of SP mountings using components of tanks already in production. It was decided to use the T-70 light tank chassis for a number of the early designs. The SU 76 had a 76.2mm M-1942 (ZIS-3) field gun mounted in a fixed superstructure on a lengthened T-70 chassis. This one is in running order, and is sometimes moved to Hall 8 when it is being prepared for displays.


79) T-80 Light Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
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Unique ID: 518
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 316 painted on left turret side.

The T-80 turned out to be an unsuccessful replacement for the T-60 and T-70. It had extra welded-on hull armour and a wider turret with a cupola. However, its 45mm gun was inadequate by 1943 and so it was only built in limited numbers.


80) K-75 Armoured Personnel Carrier Soviet


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Unique ID: 519
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 317 painted on left turret side.

The K-75 was developed in 1947, based on T-70 light tank and heavy truck components.


81) K-90 Amphibious Light Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 520

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Unique ID: 520
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 319 painted on left turret side.

The K-90 amphibious light tank was developed in 1950 as a prototype competitor for the PT-76 light tank. It was armed with a new 76mm D-56T main armament.


82) PT-76B Amphibious Light Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
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Unique ID: 521
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 320 painted on left turret side.

The PT-76 entered service in 1951 with armoured reconnaissance units and naval infantry tank regiments. It is fully amphibious without preparation and has been built in large numbers since. This is a later, standard model PT-76B, with double-baffle muzzle brake.


83) ZTPU Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Gun Soviet


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Unique ID: 522
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 321 painted on left superstructure side.

There are two variants of the BTR-50P at Kubinka that are one-off prototypes. They are self-propelled anti-aircraft vehicles, one with two 14.5mm KPVT anti-aircraft machine guns (ZTPU 2) and the other with four MGs (ZTPU-4).


84) ZTPU Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Gun Soviet


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Unique ID: 523
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 322 painted on left superstructure side.


85) BTR-50PK Armoured Personnel Carrier Soviet


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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 524

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Unique ID: 524
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 323 painted on left superstructure side.

The BTR-50P was an armoured personnel carrier developed in 1958 on the PT-76 chassis but with the turret replaced by a large open-topped superstructure. The second model to appear was the BTR-50PK which had overhead cover provided by an armoured roof.


86) BTR-50PN Armoured Personnel Carrier Soviet


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Unique ID: 525
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 324 painted on left superstructure side.

This command vehicle was based on the BTR-50P and was also known as the BTR-50PU. Series production took place in 1958.


87) PT-76M Amphibious Light Tank Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 526

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Unique ID: 526
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 325 painted on left turret side.

The PT-76M was an experimental variant of the PT-76 developed as a possible successor to the PT-76B. It was heavier, faster in water, and had a more streamlined hull.


88) Light Tank Development Prototype Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 527

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Unique ID: 527
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 326 painted on left turret side.

The next three vehicles are development prototypes investigating the replacement of the PT 76. The Obiekt 906 was based on the PT-76 but with a larger 85mm main armament. It had an aluminium hull, a steel turret and an autoloader for the gun.


89) Light Tank Development Prototype Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 528

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Unique ID: 528
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 327 painted on left turret side.

The Obiekt 685 was developed in 1975 as a new air-transportable light tank prototype. It is armed with a 100mm main armament and 7.62mm MG in a distinctive squared-off turret.


90) Light Tank Development Prototype Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 529

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Unique ID: 529
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 328 painted on left turret side.

The Obiekt 934 is the heaviest of these three competing designs. It is armed with a 100mm main armament and 7.62mm MG, and carries a bow-mounted hydraulically-operated dozer.


91) Light Tank Development Prototype Soviet


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Unique ID: 530
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 329 painted on left superstructure side.

The Obiekt 940 is based on the chassis of the 934 and is generally similar in appearance to the later MT-LBu command vehicle.


92) ASU-76 Self-Propelled Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 531

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Unique ID: 531
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 330 painted on left side.

Two air-portable SP guns that did not make it into service were the ASU-76 and K 73. The ASU-76 was developed in 1949 and has a 76.2mm gun with multi-baffle muzzle brake.


93) K-73 Self-Propelled Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 532

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Unique ID: 532
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 331 painted on left side.

The K-73 was developed in 1949 and is armed with a 57mm Ch-51 gun.


94) ASU-57 Self-Propelled Gun Soviet


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Unique ID: 533
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 332 painted on left side.

In 1951 the Soviets finally introduced an air-portable SP gun, the ASU-57, originally armed with the 57mm Ch-51 gun. Later examples such as this were armed with the Ch 51M.


95) ASU-57 Self-Propelled Gun Soviet


Number of Photos:
1
Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 534

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Unique ID: 534
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 333 painted on left side.

The ASU-57P was a modified prototype of the ASU-57 designed to be fully amphibious. It was developed in 1954 but did not enter production.


96) ASU-85 Self-Propelled Gun Soviet


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Sample Photo from Tank with UniqueID 535

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Unique ID: 535
Serial Number:
Registration:
Name:
Other Identification: Collection number 334 painted on left superstructure side.

The ASU-57 was supplemented in 1956 by the ASU-85 self-propelled gun. It is armed with a Petrov Bureau designed 85mm D 70 gun and was in use with the Soviet Parachute Divisions (VDV) before being replaced by the BMD series.